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2017 RCYC Regatta Schedule

Posted on December 13, 2016 by Leave a comment

Past Results:  2013  2014 2015 2016

Event Date NOR Results
New Years Day Race  January 1, 2017 NOR RESULTS
Turkey Fry Regatta January 28, 2017 NOR RESULTS
Love Boat Race  February 11,2017 NOR RESULTS
Texas Independence Day Regatta March 4-5, 2017 NOR RESULTS
Crawdad Cup April 8th, 2017 NOR NA
Black Tie Regatta April 21-23,2017 NOR RESULTS
Spring DinghyFest May 6-7, 2017 NOR RESULTS
Founders Regatta/IC24 North Americans May 27-28, 2017 NOR RESULTS
TSA Chocopalooza June 3-4, 2017 NOR RESULTS
MC Scow Nationals June 14-17, 2017 NOR RESULTS
George Griffith Regatta September 23-24, 2017 NOR RESULTS
Fall DinghyFest  "October 14-15 2017" NOR RESULTS
VX One North Americans October 17-22,2017 NOR RESULTS
IC24 National Championship October 28-29 2017 NOR NA
Commodore's Requiem December 2, 2017 NOR NA

2013 Regatta Result Archive

2014 Regatta Result Archive

2015 Regatta Results Archive

2016 Regatta Result Archive

Q4 MC Race Results

Posted on November 17, 2016 by Leave a comment

November 13 2016

Skipper Race 1 Race 2 Race 3 Race 4 Low-Pt
1 Greg Gust 3 1 3 7
2 Scott Slocum 5 2 4 11
3 Jeff Grinnan 4 7 1 12
4 Bill Draheim 1 11 2 14
5 Brian Morgan 6 5 6 17
6 David Hamilton 7 3 8 18
7 Tom Meyer 8 6 5 19
8 Andrew Vandling 11 4 10 25
9 Arne Winguth 9 9 7 25
10 Kelson Elam 2 14 DNS 14 DNS 30
11 Jack Kern 14 DNF 8 9 31
12 Catherine 10 10 14 DNS 34
13 Jeff Camiel 14 DNF 14 DNS 14 DNS 42
2016 IC24 Nationals Registration Form

Posted on October 24, 2016 by Leave a comment

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2016 IC24 Nationals

Posted on October 24, 2016 by Leave a comment

It’s that time of the YEAR!

IC-24 Nationals….All the club boats have been checked out, but there are plenty of spots help with Race Committee… email Race@rcyc.org.

CLICK HERE for the NOR

CLICK HERE  for the Registration

Entries…

# Skipper Boat Sail Number State
1 Ryan Doherty CRASH TBD Texas
2 Don Henry FUN TBD Texas
3 Kathy Irwin P.W.B. TBD Texas
4 Larry Seals Paint Chip TX15 Texas
5 Dave Irwin  Greybeard   5253 Texas
6 Tom Bieger TBA 5 Texas
7 Alex Porter Tickled TBA Texas
8 Per Huffeldt  And Roy Heath IC You TBD Texas
2016 Fall DinghyFest Entry Form

Posted on October 3, 2016 by Leave a comment

2016 Fall DinghyFest Oct 15&16

Posted on October 3, 2016 by Leave a comment

Rush Creek Yacht Club is proud to invite you to the 2016 Fall DinghyFest Regatta.

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We are expecting a fantastic fleet of E-Scow, Flying Scot, MC Scow, Sunfish, Laser, VX One and Portsmouth boats.

Click Here for the  2016 Fall Dinghyfest NOR

Click Here for the Registration Page

Entries….

Skipper Crew Crew Boat Sail Number Fleet
Jake Scott Lindsay Scott ??? N/A TX6 E-Scow
Blaine Unicume  Jeff Eldridge  Eric Meyer  Liberty GL-15 E-Scow
Tom Meyer Dave R Dave C Flyer M2 E-Scow
Kim Schloemer Erich Schloemer Erik Twining Restless TX-1 E-Scow
Kenny Wolfe Virginia Hannan RJ Moon N/A TX-11 E-Scow
Skipper Crew Boat Sail Number Fleet
Christopher Bright - N/A 1946 MC Scow
Jack Kern - N/A 2248 MC Scow
Arne Winguth - Elisabeth  2104 MC Scow
Scott Baker William Baker N/A 2600 MC Scow
Bill Drageim - N/A 1973 MC Scow
Tom Jacobs - N/A 2514 MC Scow
Brian Morgan - N/A 2592 MC Scow
Tim McMahon - N/A 2349 MC Scow
Per Huffeldt - N/A TBD MC Scow
Pete OConnell - Chillax 2124 MC Scow
Rob Johnston - N/A TBD MC Scow
Skipper Crew Crew Boat Sail Number Fleet
Robert Cummings Nina Cummings - Rita 5454 Flying Scot
Larry Seals Sue Madrid - Bacon 5161 Flying Scot
Melissa Hemker Eric Hemker  - Mother Boat 5398 Flying Scot
Jim Bookhout  Court Bookhout - N/A 5804 Flying Scot
Ash Beatty - - N/A 1625 RS Aero
Mike Lindstrom - - N/A 1766 RS Aero Nine
Derek McKesson - - N/A 1622 RS Aero 7
Hank Saurage - - -N/A 1626 RS Aero 7
Gil Greenwood - N/A 77981 Sunfish
Clarke Newman  Deanna Newman  Ralph Bilnoski  Boaty McBoatface  15360 Lightning
Larry Frost - Bandit 15211 Lightning
Steve Harris Mary Harris  Katherine Logue N/A 15455 Lightning
Alex Swaine Robert Phillips - N/A 153 Lightning
Scott Ballard Amanda Preston - Beagle 86 Viper 640
Ty McAden Sherrie McAden -  Muttley 951  Mutineer 15
John Upton - - N/A 6032  Mutineer 15
Randal Polson Tami Dahl - High Cotton 4764  Mutineer 15
Greg Reed  Steve Montgomery -  Strumpet 7090  Mutineer 15
Andrew Vandling - - N/A 178925 Lazer
Atlee Kohl  Dawson Kohl -  Make America Great Again! 5709  c420

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George Griffith Entry Form

Posted on September 14, 2016 by Leave a comment

The George Griffith 9/24-9/25

Posted on September 14, 2016 by Leave a comment

J22-North-Americans-017

The George Griffith Regatta is being held at Rush Creek Yacht Club on September 24th and 25th.  With races catered for keel boats, we expect several different courses.

Come join us for a great regatta geared towards having fun and pumping your competitive juices.

Click here for the 2016 George Griffith Notice of Race

Click here for the Registration Form

Current Entires…

Boat Skipper Sail Number Boat Type PHRF
My Girl  Ron & Kaye Surley XXX Albert 37 SR 189
Nada Jack Marsh 3411 J-24 168
Eleanor Tom Jacobs 56 J-27 129
Orion  Daniel Malak 16644 Hunter31 174
Runaway Melissa Hemker JKLM Hunter 31 186
Clair de Lune Bob Barnes 287 Catalina 25SK 231
TBD  Greg Brewer 2189 Catalina 25fk 228
Second Wind  Phil McBride TBD Catalina 25   228
Green Flash David Woody 130 VX-one 105
Hotter Tuna  Robert C Williams USA53 11 Meter OD 75
Rented Mule Brian Taylor USA14 Viper 830 66
Boat Skipper Sail Number Boat Type
GrayBeard David Irwin 5253 IC24
PBW Kathy Irwin 00 IC24
Paint Chip Larry Seals TX15 IC24
Reflections  Tom Bieger 5 IC24
IC You Per Huffeldt & Roy Heath TBA IC24
Boat Skipper Sail Number Boat Type
Drunk'n Donkey Paul Calce USA162 Melges 24
Gringo Ryan Glaze USA62 Melges 24
Rocket Science David Hoye USA65 Melges 24
Play Date Eric Twining USA85 Melges 24
Karma Scott Willey USAtbd Melges 24

 

Q3 Race Series

Posted on August 24, 2016 by Leave a comment

Saturday, July 30, 2016

  Skipper Race 1 Race 2 Race 3 Race 4 Total
1 Bill Draheim 1 1 1 1             4
2 David Hamilton 2 5 3 2           12
3 David Hoye 4 2 2 4           12
4 Chris Bright 5 3 9 3           20
5 Rex Moon 3 4 4 12 DNS           23
6 Pete O’Connell 7 7 5 6           25
7 Kevin Ganci 6 6 8 12 DNS           32
8 Eric Hemker 12 DNS 12 DNS 6 5           35
9 Mike Brown 8 12 OCS 10 7           37
10 Scott Ballard 9 9 11 8           37
11 Jack Kern 12 DNF 8 7 12 DNS           39

 

Saturday, August 6, 2016

  Skipper Race 1 Race 2 Race 3 Race 4 Total
1 Greg Gust 1 2 1 1             5
2 Scott Slocum 3 1 2 2             8
3 Brian Morgan 2 3 3 3           11
4 Bill Draheim 4 4 4 4           16
5 David Hamilton 6 5 5 7 DNF           23
6 Jack Kern 5 6 6 7 DNS           24

 

Saturday, August 13, 2016

  Skipper Race 1 Race 2 Race 3 Race 4 Total
1 Bill Draheim 1 1 1 3
2 Greg Gust 2 2 2 6
3 David Hamilton 5 3 3 11
4 Rob Johnston 3 6 4 13
5 David Hoye 4 4 5 13
6 Chris Bright 6 8 7 21
7 Brian Morgan 8 5 9 22
8 Tom Jacobs 7 7 10 24
9 Pete O’Connell 10 9 8 27
10 Arne Winguth 14 DNS 10 6 30
11 Alex Porter 9 11 12 32
12 Jeff & V Greenwood 12 12 11 35
13 Jack Kern 11 14 DNF 14 DNS 39

 

Sunday, September 3, 2016

Skipper Race 1 Race 2 Race 3 Total
1 David Hamilton 3 1 5                     9
2 Pete O’Connell 5 2 3                   10
3 Brian Morgan 1 10 [DNS] 2                   13
4 Scott Slocum 10 [DNS] 3 1                   14
5 Arne Winguth 2 5 7                   14
6 Eric Hemker 4 4 6                   14
7 Jack Kern 6 6 4 16
8 Chris Bright 7 7 9 23
9 Austin Benson 8 8 10 [DNS] 26
10 Alex Porter 9 9 8 26

 

Sunday, September 11, 2016

Skipper Race 1 Race 2 Race 3 Race 4 Total
1 Greg Gust 3 1 2 1 7
2 Bill Draheim 4 2 1 2 9
3 Pete O’Connell 2 3 4 3 12
4 Tom Jacobs 1 5 3 6 15
5 Mike Brown 5 4 6 4 19
6 Jack Kern 6 6 5 5 22
7 Cheryl 7 [DNS] 7 7 7 28

 

Sunday, October 2, 2016

Skipper Race 1 Race 2 Race 3 Race 4 Total
1 Rob Johnston 1 2 1 3 7
2 Greg Gust 3 1 3 1 8
3 Brian Morgan 2 3 4 2 11
4 Jack Kern 4 4 2 8 DNS 18
5 Arne Winguth 5 5 5 4 19
6 Mike Brown 8 DNS 8 DNS 6 5 27
7 Cheryl Gondron 8 DNS 6 7 6 27

 

Sunday, October 9, 2016

Skipper Race 1 Race 2 Race 3 Race 4 Total
1 Scot Slocum 3 1 1 1            6
2 Bill Draheim 2 2 2 3            9
3 Pete O’Connell 1 4 4 2          11
4 Tom Meyer 5 3 3 4          15
5 Jeff & V Greenwood 4 5 5 5          19

 

Sunday, October 23, 2016

Skipper Race 1 Race 2 Race 3 Race 4 Total
1 Scot Slocum 3 1 1 5
2 David Hamilton 2 2 2 6
3 Greg Gust 1 3 4 8
4 Per Huffeldt * 5 4 3 12
5 David Hoye 4 7 DNF 7 DNS 18
6 Scott Ballard 6 5 7 OCS 18

 

Sunday, October 30, 2016

Skipper Race 1 Race 2 Race 3 Race 4 Total
1 Greg Gust 2 2 2 6 12
2 Scott Slocum 4 4 * 3 2 13
3 Jeff Grinnan 3 6 5 3 17
4 Rob Johnston 1 1 9 9 20
5 David Hoye 10 10 1 1 22
6 Pete O’Connell 5 5 10 4 24
7 David Hamilton 8 3 11 5 27
8 Brian Morgan 11 9 6 8 34
9 Jack Kern 9 7 4 15 DNS 35
10 Tom Jacobs 7 13 7 11 38
11 Arne Winguth 13 12 8 7 40
12 Mike Brown 6 15 DSQ 12 12 45
13 Bill Draheim 12 8 13 13 46
14 Catherine 15 DNS 11 14 10 50

 

Summary

Place Skipper Participation * Final Score ** Races Scored  of: 18 RC Races Performed
1 Greg Gust 60% 0.946 11 0
2 Bill Draheim 100% 0.923 15 3
3 David Hamilton 70% 0.841 13 0
4 Brian Morgan 70% 0.829 9 4
5 Pete O’Connell 100% 0.782 14 4
6 Arne Winguth 50% 0.77 5 4
7 Chris Bright 60% 0.754 10 0
8 Mike Brown 60% 0.706 8 3
9 Jack Kern 80% 0.7 15 0
Scott Slocum 30% [0.915] 6 0
David Hoye 40% [0.853] 7 0
Rex Moon 20% [0.844] 3 0
Rob Johnston 20% [0.833] 3 0
Eric Hemker 30% [0.779] 5 0
Tom Jacobs 40% [0.772] 7 0
Kevin Ganci 20% [0.738] 3 0
Austin Benson 10% [0.684] 2 0
Alex Porter 30% [0.667] 6 0
Cheryl Gondron 20% [0.667] 3 0
Scott Ballard 20% [0.665] 4 0
Jeff & V Greenwood 20% [0.644] 3 0

 

2016 MC Masters Nationals Recap

Posted on July 14, 2016 by Leave a comment

Bill Draheim and crew Mary Anne Hopper recently won the MC Masters National Championship at Lake Fenton Sailing Club.  RCYC’s resident ‘Old Salt’ Jack Kern asked a couple of questions about the regatta that were of interest to the RCYC MC fleet; they were also topics of conversation around the Gus Sails beer cooler at the regatta.  Here are Bill’s answers…

How and where did you choose to start and how early did you set up?

The first day the wind was across the short direction of the lake with velocity between 6 and 15 and very shifty.  We always chose to start where the best velocity was and it varied every race.  A lot of people like to approach on port tack but we always set up early on starboard tack, creeping along to where we wanted to be at the start.

The last day of racing, the breeze was consistently stronger than the first day but not as shifty and from the long direction of the lake.  Unlike the first day, we did not necessarily choose to start in the dark water because the shifts and velocity were not changing as rapidly.  Because it was easier to see the dark water lasting for longer duration, we tried to start in a position that put us in darker water for a longer period of time.  One anomaly of the long beat was the position of the yacht club and how it affected the bottom end of course.  A pin start meant the need to tack very soon onto port so we tried to avoid that.  Once or twice boats on the line were pinching high and going very slow so we made the decision to give up our favorite position on the line and sail below them looking for a better spot where we could come off the line with speed.

Did you have trouble holding your lane off the starting line and if so discuss your technique.

One thing we do to help keep our lane on the starting line is to keep the weather board down until 20ish seconds to the start.  It is important to stay farther away from the boat to leeward and closer to the boat to weather.  We also work to be behind the boats to weather and leeward so we can ‘hit the accelerator’ with a few seconds before the start and be moving faster.  If you are able to dig closer to the weather boat and go faster at the start, you shouldn’t have any problem holding your lane.  Being farther away from boat to leeward gives you the ability to fall off and go faster if you need to.  If you can do those two things, you will know 5 seconds after the start that you can hold your lane (forever) and if you don’t you will know 5 seconds after the start that you can’t.  Remember that sometimes to hold your lane, you might not be able to sail the upwind style that you want to.  For example, if the boat to leeward is pinching you might need to as well until your bow gets in front of him.  This change of normal upwind technique should only last until the fleet settles in off the starting line.  Lastly, the only time we sail with traveler right on center line is right at the start.

Discuss your management of the first weather leg as to sailing to shifts, dark water, side of the course, etc.

The beats on the first day were very short because we sailed across short side of lake which meant we were never very far from the next dark water even if it was on the other side of the race course.  The number one consideration was sailing towards the dark water (puffs) and looking well upwind (2 – 3 puffs ahead).  We were not afraid to chase breeze across the race course because the legs were so short.  One race we started near the left end of line and missed the first puff on the right and could see the next puff to the right beyond that one.  It was so important to get to the dark water that we sailed thru the fleet, taking a lot of transoms.  But, we got to the next velocity and rounded top mark in 18th (as opposed to 28th).

The day was a great day of puffs on both sides of the course making it easy to work upwind ‘connecting the dots’ (puffs being the dots).  Some people made the mistake of getting into a lull/header combo and tacking.  We only tacked if we were in a puff or attempting to get to one but never in a lull that was a header.  Velocity can be a much more important factor than the compass heading when deciding where to tack.

It was still shifty sailing the third day but the long beats made the course much more predictable.  It was easier to plan to get to and stay in the dark water for longer periods of time.  It was not quite as nerve racking as the first day!

Discuss decision making after rounding leeward gate for 2nd and 3rd upwind legs, if sailing in mid fleet as opposed to having clear air in front of you.

We almost always made big gains at the gates.  The first thing we try to do when evaluating where to go upwind is to start looking at the boats sailing downwind to gauge their angles and pressure.  They are a good telltale for what will be happening on the upwind beat.

With shifty conditions like what we saw in this regatta, big gains can be made by rounding the proper leeward gate.  Those gains can be made in different areas.  If there is a simple wind direction change relative to the two marks and for a reasonable time in future, round the mark that is more upwind to get further up the course.  For example, if the wind is lifted on port tack upwind, round the starboard gate going downwind.  Sometimes wind velocity makes the biggest impact on the decision and rounding the gate that gets you to the new wind the quickest is most important.

Some sailors will let themselves get stuck because they are afraid to sail back thru the downwind fleet.  Remember that it is the velocity or wind angle that dictates the tack, not the traffic.  In addition, the fleet wasn’t that big to begin with so we did not experience big losses when we found it necessary to sail back thru the downwind sailors for velocity or wind.

It did happen one race that we were mid-fleet and all of the little tactical decisions remain.  In very large fleets, you might have to wait longer for your spot to tack but in a 30ish boat fleet you should still be able to work the shifts (connect the dots) upwind.  If you do that, you will be surprised how quickly you can move up thru the fleet.  A lot of sailors aren’t disciplined enough to tack when they should and end up sailing longer on tacks (and out on the corners).  Be patient.  When the wind is very, very steady it becomes more important to not sail in other people’s bad air.  But when it is shiftier and puffier, always take advantage of the velocity and shifts, even if you sail in dirty air.

Assuming neutral direction wind, how soon did you jibe to port and go left on the downwind.

It’s not break time.  Huge gains can be made downwind because many sailors aren’t as disciplined about sailing proper (good) angles as they are on the upwind legs.   Remember that you need to sail downwind in the puffs.  The top guys will typically extend when they round ahead because they sail lower in the puffs.

 

If the wind is steady, you don’t typically want to jibe right away at the offset mark because there is a big pack of upwind boats coming your way – a lot of dirty air.  When you’re down the course a little bit, jibing to port generally works because boats that haven’t jibed also aren’t sailing down.  It’s best to put yourself in a position to be able take the puffs down.  This part of the sport is interesting because people tend to sail higher angles.  It might feel faster but you’re sailing farther than the guys that are sailing down in the puffs.  The best thing to remember is ‘think discipline when sailing downwind.

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